- Illustrated History of Coins and Tokens relating to Canada - P.N. Breton - Coins and Canada

Illustrated History of Coins and Tokens relating to Canada

Quebec (#520 to #716)

Breton 520 - Canada

520

After the American Revolution the Magdalen Islands were granted to Sir Isaac Coffin, who only once visited his American possessions; this was in 1815. Before starting he ordered a large number of these coins and a coining press from Sir Edward Thomason, of Birmingham. These he brought to the Islands and distributed the coins by way of loans among the chief men in the Islands. It was his purpose to set up a mint and coin half-pennies as well, but no other coin than the above was ever issued. R. 2 ½.

Magdalen Island - 1815 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 521 - Canada

521

One Penny pieces of this design were issued by the Bank of Montreal–Banque du Peuple–the City Bank and the Quebec Bank. On one side is a habitant in winter costume, which, as the coin was issued in the rebellion year, has led to the calling of these pieces Papineau's by the French Canadians. Papineau, who was the leader in the troubles of 1837, was looked upon as a great patriot. This name has been continued by collectors who still allude to the series as Papineau's. The value of this coin was raised to two cents by order in Council, passed 30th August, 1870, which orders that as pence and halfpence were not needed for purchasing stamps or for other transactions, they had no reason to circulate, that a uniform currency of dollars and cents be established. This increased the value of the penny piece by one-fifth. R. 1.

1 penny 1837 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 522 - Canada

522

Half-penny piece issued by the Bank of Montreal–La Banque du Peuple–City Bank and Quebec Bank. See remarks about No. 521. R. 1.

1/2 penny 1837 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 523 - Canada

523

1838-39. The Bank of Montreal, founded in 1817, was the first incorporated banking institution to do business in Canada. This bank has always been at the head of banking affairs in Canada, and is now the strongest bank on the continent. This, with the two following coins, are known as Side Views, because an end as well as a front view of the bank is given. This is truly the most popular coin among Canadian collectors, and, notwithstanding that a fair number have come to light so great is the demand that the price has always remained high. 1838 - R. 4 ½. 1839 - R. 4.

1 penny 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 524 - Canada

524

1838-39. The remarks connected with the last, No. 523, apply also to this coin. 1838 - R. 4. 1839 - 3 varieties, R. 4.

1/2 penny 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 525 - Canada

525

1839. This coin, with the name of the Bank of Montreal on the obverse, has Banque du Peuple on the ribbon on the reverse. It was most likely never issued for circulation, consequently few specimens of this rare piece are known. R. 4 ½.

1 penny 1839 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 526 - Canada

526

When in 1841, the Union of the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada was accomplished, Montreal was chosen as the seat of government. The Bank of Montreal consequently became the government bankers, and thus had the sole right for several years to issue coins. This coin is now almost completely out of circulation, and good specimens have already sold as high as one dollar. R. 2.

1 penny 1842 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 527 - Canada

527

1842-44-45. See remarks appended to last coin, No. 526. The only known specimen of 1845 is in the collection of Thos. Wilson, of Clarence, Ont. 1842-44 - R. 1., 1845 - R. 5.

1/2 penny 1842 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 528 - Canada

528

The Quebec Bank was founded in 1818, one year after the Bank of Montreal, and has occupied the first place among the banks of the ancient capital.

After the riots caused by the passage of the Rebellion Losses Bill and the burning of the Parliament Buildings in 1849, the seat of government was removed, and alternated between Quebec and Toronto until it finally fixed at Ottawa.

During this time the Quebec Bank and the Bank of Upper Canada received the government deposits. For this reason the Quebec Bank issued this coin under government authority. R. 1.

1 penny 1852 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 529 - Canada

529

See remarks appended to last, No. 528. R. 1.

1/2 penny 1852 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 530 - Canada

530

It was found that ordinary railway tickets were not convenient for use among the Indians and workmen on the Lachine Canal, who formed the bulk of the third class travel by this road. These tickets were therefore imported from Birmingham.

They were strung on a wire as they were collected by the conductor. The balance remaining in the hands of the Montreal and Champlain Railway Company, were melted at St. Lambert in 1862. R. 2 ½.

Railroad Company - Montreal & Lachine - Price Guide and Values


Breton 531 - Canada

531

Bust of Wellington. This coin was imported on speculation, as it is struck on very thin planchets allowing a large margin for profit. R. 1.

Montreal - 1/2 penny 1816 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 532 - Canada

532

1830-41. Issued by James Duncan & Co. hardware merchants, of Montreal. R. 1 ½.

Duncan & Company - 1/2 penny 1830 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 533 - Canada

533

Issued in Montreal about 1830. The side bearing the ship is the same as that of No. 913. R. 1 ½.

Public accomodation - 1/2 penny 1831 - Price Guide and Values


History of the Bout de Lisle Tokens

(Illustrated under Nos. 534 to 545.)

Bout de l'Isle

These twelve tokens, about which a number of contradictory histories have been written, are the most interesting of any of our Canadian coins. They were struck at Birmingham and imported to be used as tickets or passes over three different bridges, which bridges stood for only a short time, and the following facts culled from authentic documents will help us to understand the important position they hold in our Canadian collections.

These three bridges were built to unite the Island of Montreal with the mainland, by way of Isle Bourdon, which Islet is situated at the mouth of the L'Assomption River.

Isle Bourdon was ceded to Sieur de Repentigny on the 3rd of November, 1672, and became the property of Mr. Thomas Porteous, of Terrebonne, who, in 1805, secured the authorization of the Lower Canadian Government to build two wooden bridges, of which one is from Lachenaie to Isle Bourdon, and another from the Isle Bourdon to the Island of Montreal. These two bridges were completed in 1806 and approved by experts on the 18th of October in the same year; unfortunately, although built at great expense, they were carried away by ice on Saturday evening, April 25th, 1807.

Notwithstanding this loss, Mr. Porteous asked for, and secured from the Government, on the14th of April, 1808, authority to rebuild, and also to build a third bridge between Repentigny and Isle Bourdon, thus connecting the main road and the one most traveled in the province, but these last structures, which had the same faults as the first, met with a like fate shortly after their completion. Mr. Porteous afterwards sold Isle Bourdon to Mr. Henry Griffin, who later on sold it to a Mr. Ross.

It finally passed into the hands of the Honorable James Leslie. Mr. James N. S. Leslie, of Montreal, grandson of the Honorable James Leslie, and son of Patrick Leslie, is executor of the estate, and along with his sister, Mrs. Godfrey Weir, are the proprietors of this historic island, which does not exceed two hundred acres in extent.

Mr. Thomas Porteous died in Montreal in 1834, and none of his children are now living.

His grandson, Mr. Thomas Porteous, Real Estate Agent, Montreal, who has given me a number of items regarding the family, is the son of Mr. James Porteous, formerly merchant at St. Therese, who, himself, built in 1830, the St. Rose Bridge.

In 1892, Mr. A. Desroches, of Montreal, on hearing of the existence of a model of these bridges, informed roe of the fact, and accompanied me last October to verify the truth of the existence of this valuable relic.

Arrived at Isle Bourdon, we came across the tenant, Mr. Thomas Buchanan, who had the kindness to show us the old Porteous residence, now used as a barn and there in the garret we found the model of a part of a bridge.

This model, which has an antique appearance, and which should be preserved in a museum, is fifteen feet long, and represents a double bridge to allow two vehicles to pass without difficulty.

The bridge and the Porteous House here reproduced were drawn by Mr. Francois Breton, my father, who accompanied me in a second visit to the island; we have also been able easily to locate the positions of the bridges by certain traces still visible; thus, the Lachenaie bridge started from a point below the church, where is now the village of Charlemagne; further, the topographical map here reproduced gives accurately enough positions of each of these three bridges, and will clearly show to our readers how these tokens were used by a comparison of the map with the inscription which each variety bears; thus, the pieces inscribed de L'Isle de Montreal a Repentigny ou Lachenaie, were used for a foot passenger, a horse, a cart or a caleche respectively, from the Island of Montreal across the bridge to Isle Bourdon, and thence by one or other of the two bridges to Repentigny or Lachenaie, and in the same way for the others either to go or return always by way of Isle Bourdon.

Bout de l'Isle

The two errors in spelling on these tokens are easily explained, as the dies were engraved at Birmingham by a workman ignorant of French, who having only a description, perhaps carelessly written, substituted a U for the last N in Repentigny, also in the au Repentigny on Lachenaie made a similar mistake, but this time substituted an N for the U.

The Lachenaie varieties, with the exception of three or four specimens, are all clipped, and this is attributed to the fact that the guardian of the Lachenaie Bridge was unable to read, and clipped them to distinguish from the others.

The different lengths of these bridges appears to have been to acres for the Bout de L'Isle bridge, 2 ½ acres for the Lachenaie one, and 2 acres for that of Repentigny.

Crossing is now made in this place by a horse boat.

The Bout de L'Isle tokens are very rare and consequently much sought after, and therefore, at no distant date will command high prices.

Last year, some individuals attempted to pass off on collectors, a number of counterfeits as originals, but happily these frauds were soon discovered, and it may prove an expensive operation should anyone attempt to bring them out in the near future.

The following copies and extracts from Acts and other documents will be read with interest by subscribers, as all confirm our contention regarding the existence of these bridges. From these will be learned the amount of tolls charged and the values represented by the coins above described.

Bout de l'Isle

The 26th January, 1805. A petition from Thomas Porteous, of Terrebonne, was presented to the House for the introduction of a Bill to enable him to build two bridges.

Extract from the Act of the 45th Geo. III chap. XIV.

25th March, 1805.

An Act to authorize Thomas Porteous, Esquire, to build a bridge over a branch of the River Ottawa , otherwise Des Prairies, from La Chenaye to the Island called Bourdon; and an other bridge from that Island to the Island of Montreal, to establish the rates of toll payable thereon, and for regulating the said bridges.

Thomas Porteous, by this Act, was obliged to erect and: complete said bridges, toll houses, etc., within three years.

With a drawbridge or opening of at least 25 feet wide, to be made in the bridge to be erected over the said river, from the said Island Bourdon to the said Island of Montreal, where the river is sufficiently deep, and the said Porteous is also required to employ one or more persons who shall, during the season of navigation, stand at the said drawbridge, to be drawn or otherwise opened without delay for the passage of schooners, or other vessels with standing rigging.

The Tolls:

  • For every Calach with two wheels, or Cariole or other such carriage, loaded or unloaded, with the driver and two persons or less, drawn by two horses or other beasts of draught, Two shillings and nine pence currency; and if drawn by one horse or other beast of draught, Two shillings and six pence currency.
  • For every cart, sled or other such carriage, loaded or unloaded, drawn by two horses, oxen or other beasts of draught, with the driver, Two shillings and three pence currency; and if drawn by one horse or other beast of draught, Two shillings currency.
  • For every person on foot, Six pence currency.
  • For every horse, mare, mule or other beast of draught, laden or unladen, Ten pence currency.

The Douglas, Montreal and Lachenaye Royal Bridge

We, the subscribers, being appointed experts to examine the bridge erected and built by Thomas Porteous, Esq., of Terrebonne, in the County of Effingham, over that branch of the River Ottawa, otherwise Des Prairies, which lies between La Chenaye and the Island called Bourdon, and. another bridge over another branch of the said river which lies between the said Island and the Island of Montreal, and being duly sworn to give our opinion whether the said bridges are now fit and proper for the passage of travelers, cattle and carriages, do hereby, on the oath we have taken, certify that on the eighteenth day of October., one thousand eight hundred and six, we proceeded to a careful examination of the said bridges, and do depose and declare that in our opinion the said bridges are now fit and proper for the passage of travelers, cattle and carriages.

(Signed) GILBERT MILLER, JOHN ROBERTSON, ALEXANDER LOGIE - BOURDON ISLAND, October 18th, 1806.

District de Montreal.

We, the subscribers, three of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace, for the District of Montreal, do certify that in conformity to an Act of the Legislature of this Province, entitled "An Act to authorize Thomas Porteous, Esq., to build a bridge over a branch of the River Ottawa, etc.", we appointed Gilbert Miller and John Robertson, master carpenters, and Alexander Logie, master mason, all of the City of Montreal, experts, to examine the said bridges now erected and built, and being duly sworn to give their opinion whether the same were now fit and proper for the passage of travelers, cattle and carriages, they, the said experts, did depose and declare that, in their opinion, the said bridges are now fit and proper for the passage of travelers, cattle and carriages, and which deposition is here unto annexed and by them signed.

Given under our hands at Bourdon Island this eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and six.

(Signed) JOHN RICHARDSON, J. P. - ROBERT CRUICKSHANK, J. P - ALEXANDER AULDJO, J. P.

N.B. - The public will please to observe, that it is. forbidden by law to trot or gallop, either on horseback or in carriages on any public bridge, and the proprietor hopes that due attention will be paid thereto; neither can any person be permitted to go on the said bridges with a lighted pipe or fire of any description. T. P.

Le Canadien

Quebec, Saturday, May 2nd, 1807.

We are sorry to learn that the new bridge lately built at the foot of the Island of Montreal, by Thomas Porteous, Esquire, of Terrebonne, was carried away by ice last Saturday evening.

14th April, 1808.

Act 48 Geo. III. Chap. XXIII, to prolong the time granted to Thomas Porteous, Esquire, of Terrebonne, for rebuilding certain bridge carried away by the ice.

14th April, 1808.

Act 48 Geo. III. Chap. XXIV, to authorize Thomas Porteous, Esquire, of Terrebonne, to erect a bridge from Repentigny to the Island called Bourdon.

Breton 534 - Canada

534

R. 4 ½.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 535 - Canada

535

R. 4 ½.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 536 - Canada

536

R. 4 ½.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 537 - Canada

537

R. 4 ½.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 538 - Canada

538

R. 4.


Breton 539 - Canada

539

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 540 - Canada

540

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 541 - Canada

541

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 542 - Canada

542

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 543 - Canada

543

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 544 - Canada

544

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 545 - Canada

545

R. 4.

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Repentigny Tokens

(Illustrated under Nos. 546 to 557.)

These twelve Repentigny tokens remained unknown until 1890. Since their discovery they have been the object of considerable, controversy, many eminent collectors holding that they are of recent fabrication.

It seems to me, that if it had been the purpose to issue such a series for gain, that they would have attempted something similar to the regular Bout de L'Isle tokens but this is a totally different series, all relating to Repentigny.

The fact that the Repentigny Bridge was built after the others (See History of the Bout de L'Isle tokens,) may explain why these tokens were ordered. Mr. Lyman H. Low, of New York, who came into possession of these tokens, has written me a letter, from which I give quotations, which gives a clear explanation regarding the discovery of these coins.

NEW YORK, N.Y., Oct. 19th, 1893.

In the year 1890, a set of Repentigny bridge tokens, of the series known as the Bout de L'Isle Tokens, came into the hands of the writer from England. This set has excited considerable interest on this side of the Atlantic, from the fact that it is of a type differing in character from any heretofore known, and, so far as known, is unique. An illustration of these tokens appears in the Supplement to Mr. Breton's Canadian Coin Collector, 892. (Nos. 349G to 349R.)

After a careful examination of these pieces, I reached the conclusion that they are genuine patterns, and are of the same period as those which were used, while these were rejected, I have since seen no reason to change the opinion then formed.

One of the principal objections raised against their authenticity is that the inscriptions are misspelled the word ON being substituted for OU and that therefore, since the same error occurs in the dies of the accepted series, those were blindly imitated perhaps through the workman's ignorance of the language. This objection, I believe, has little weight. There is no reason why the dies from which the pieces under consideration were struck, may not have been an experiment by the same maker, who fell into the same error into which he had stumbled on his previous effort, if indeed the others were really the earlier in point of time; and, as to this, who shall decide which are the older and therefore the original dies on which the error first occurred? Even were both sets cut by different English engravers, probably having no knowledge of French, it would not lie surprising that both had fallen into a similar error. In either case it cannot be doubted that the blunder arose from a careless reading of directions furnished from this side of the water ; certainly nothing could be more easily confounded by one not familiar with the language, than "on" and "ou" in a manuscript. The character of the workmanship is not that of later time; in fact, it is perceptibly different.

The pieces were sold at auction in London, by Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, on the 31st of July, 1890, in a catalogue of various collections, Lot No. 80; with them, were some 107 Eighteenth Century tokens, and the purchaser of the lot has informed me that he then attached more importance to the latter than to the Bridge Tokens, a ground evidently taken by the cataloguer. If these pieces had been of recent fabrication, and intended to deceive, it is hardly conceivable that they should have been thrown in with a number of other pieces without protection, in a market so distant, and in a sale of such brief announcement that none of the Catalogues were sent to America. Certainly, no one would presume to intimate anything like collusion on the part of that old and well known house. The pieces simply possessed no special value, so far as the sellers had knowledge, and not the slightest effort was made to attract the attention of collectors here or abroad to their rarity. There can be but one conclusion, and that is, that the pieces are just what they profess to be neither more nor less.

Were anything further needed to corroborate this view as to their genuineness, it might he mentioned that not a single duplicate of any of them has ever been seen or heard of.

Taking, then, the facts which I have gleaned touching this set of tokens, and judging them from my experience and observation of the known series and its history, I can come to no other conclusion than that they are authentic, and struck from dies made in the early part of the century, and the pieces not having been approved, were neither issued nor duplicated.

LYMAN H. LOW.

Breton 546 - Canada

546


Breton 547 - Canada

547

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 548 - Canada

548


Breton 549 - Canada

549


Breton 550 - Canada

550

A Isle de Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 551 - Canada

551


Breton 552 - Canada

552


Breton 553 - Canada

553


Breton 554 - Canada

554


Breton 555 - Canada

555


Breton 556 - Canada

556


Breton 557 - Canada

557


Breton 558 - Canada

558

On the 18th of October, 1807, Sir James Craig arrived in Canada as Governor. He was then 57 years of age, 42 of which he had passed in the army. He had already seen service in America, having been present at the actions at Saratoga, under Burgoyne. He had taken a leading part in the capture of the Cape of Good Hope, served five years in India, and subsequently as commander of the Corps d'Armee in the Mediterranean, thus he had risen to one of the highest positions in the service. But his constitution was broken with disease, which made him irritable and dictatorial in manner. He took the reins of Government at a most critical time, and at the opening of his first parliament assumed dictatorial powers and thus made himself very unpopular.

One of his first acts was to dismiss Messrs. Panet, Bedard, Taschereau, Borgia and Blanchet from the militia. From April, 1809, to the 26th of February, 1810, he dissolved two parliaments, and twice appealed to the people without being able to change its complexion, which continued to be 14 English and 36 French speaking Canadians. On the 17th of March, on a warrant of justice Sewell, he sent a company of soldiers to seize the whole of the type, and presses of Le Canadien of Quebec, which had been regularly published since November 22nd, 1806. The printer was arrested, and also, two days afterwards, three members of Parliament, Messrs. Bedard, Blanchet and Taschereau, at Quebec. Messrs. Laforce, Pierre Papineau and Corbeil, were subjected to the same indignity at Montreal. One fact is certain, nothing appeared in the columns of Le Canadien that warranted the outrage. On December the 12th, of the same year, Sir James Craig opened the new parliament; in the meantime all the prisoners had been liberated except Bedard, who refused to leave the prison without a trial. This last parliament he prorogued on the 21st of March, 1811, having previously asked to be recalled from the Governorship on account of failing health. Although his farewell speech, it was, like all his speeches from the throne, dictatorial and bitter. He left Canada on the 11th of June, 1811, and died in England in January, 1812.

Garneau speaks of him as a capricious and narrow administrator. The coins illustrated under Nos. 558 and 559 are satirical pieces relating to the administration of this Governor, and to judge from the inscription on the obverse, describe him as the "Pest of Canadians" or better, "The Torment of Canadians." The reverse has been translated to mean "Don't you wish you may catch them." All specimens are poorly struck, and it is impossible to find any in good condition; such specimens should be accepted. They are becoming rare; three to four dollars being easily obtained for them. Several varieties. R. 3.


Breton 559 - Canada

559

Same history as last. Several varieties. R. 3.


Breton 560 - Canada

560

LEAD. – Issued by John Goudie, to be used as tickets on the ferry steamer, "Lauzon," that ran between Quebec and Point Levi. The ferry passed into the hands of J. McKenzie, who stamped his initials J. McK. on many of the tokens. This was long considered very rare, but a number of counterfeit specimens have turned up lately, of which some were sold to collectors. R. 4. Surcharged J. McK. R. 4 ½.

Lauzon - Quebec-Levis - 1821 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 561 - Canada

561

Issued about the year 1832. Two varieties–one like the cut and the other with the S in importers further to the left under the C in Co. R. 1 ½.

T.S. Brown & Company - 1/2 penny 1837 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 562 - Canada

562

The firm which issued this coin was long the most enterprising in the city. The father, John Molson, owned the steamboat Accommodation, the first to run on the St. Lawrence, which left Montreal on her first trip November 3rd, 1809, with ten passengers bound for Quebec, taking 36 hours to accomplish the voyage, the price being $8.00 for the trip down and $9.00 from Quebec to Montreal. On August 20th, 1812, he launched the Swiftsure, and these, two boats were used to transport troops between the two cities during the war of 1812-14.

The dies, which were engraved by Joseph Arnault in Montreal, are still in possession of the firm. This coin occurs with thick and thin planchets. R. 3.

Thos. & Wm. Molson - 1/2 penny 1837 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 563 - Canada

563

This coin was ordered in anticipation of the son's entering the partnership, but this was never consummated. R. 2.

Francis Mullins & Son - 1/2 penny 1829 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 564 - Canada

564

Owen's Ropery was set up in the eastern part of the city. It was established about the year 1824. Shortly afterwards the concern was sold out to John A. Converse, the founder of the Montreal Ropery, now merged into the Canada Cordage Co. One of these pieces sold for $55.00 at a coin sale in New York. R. 5.

R.W. Owen - Montreal Ropery - Price Guide and Values


Breton 565 - Canada

565

Issued in 1837. The business is still carried on in Quebec by sons of the founder. R. 1 ½

J. Shaw - Importers of Harwares - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 566 - Canada

566

This firm was established in Montreal in 1849, and its dissolution not very long afterwards, indicates why the coin was not issued in any large quantity. One of the sons of Mr. Maysenholder, now 37 years of age, also a jeweler, residing in Montreal, well remembers an employee of his father use these dies to strike sufficient of these coins to pay for his drinks. In the year 1886, Mr. A. Desroches discovered seven of these coins, and a little later 24 others, making 31 in all, besides seven pieces struck only on one side. He has not been able to find any trace of the dies. Mr. Desroches who, himself, has given these facts, guarantees their authenticity. His reason for not sooner communicating them to the public was, that he might secure all these coins that were to be had, and exchange or sell them to the best advantage. Mr. Desroches has disposed of the whole of the find at good prices, and they are becoming very rare, selling easily from 15 to 25 dollars. R. 4.

Maysenholder & Bohle - 1/2 penny 1849 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 567 - Canada

567

Hunterstown is a small village on the Riviere du Loup, about 25 miles from Louiseville. Sometime, about the year 1850, an American lumbering firm, known as the Hunterstown Lumbering Company, secured the limits, and for years carried on extensive operations. The company had a supply store, and paid their men in script, redeemable at the store. This coin was good for a half-penny. The first specimen known to collectors came into the hands of Mr. P. Murphy at Quebec; another found by Mr. A. Nutter was sold for $25.00. R. 4.

Hunterstown Lumber Co. - Price Guide and Values


Breton 568 - Canada

568

Issued towards the end of the year 1862, by a firm of exchange brokers, of which the head of the firm, Mr. Wm. Weir, is at present the President and General Manager of La Banque Ville Marie, at Montreal. Mr. Weir still carries on the business as Banker with his two sons as partners, on Notre Dame Street, Montreal. When specie payment was suspended in the United States, the people found it so difficult to get change that they had stamps encased as the above, and Mr. Larminee, on a visit to New York, had a quantity made for his firm, although such change was not required in Canada. R. 4.


Breton 569 - Canada

569

On inquiring from Mr. Devins, shortly before his death, he gave the following information about this coin; He had made some enquiries to one of his friends in England about the cost of a coin inscribed with his business card. What was his surprise then, although he had gone no further, to learn that a consignment of these coins had been seized at the Montreal Custom House. Not having ordered the coins, and having no invoice, although he had written to England, he got no reply, his friend being dead. He left the; coins unclaimed in the hands of the authorities. In the meantime, collectors sought to procure the coins, and secured a number from friends in the Custom House. When this came to the knowledge of the Minister, the balance was ordered to be melted. Mr. Devins could not tell how many were struck or circulated; although he never had any of these coins in his possession he was constantly troubled with requests for these from collectors. R. 2 ½.

Devins & Bolton - Province of Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 570 - Canada

570

Struck in Birmingham for R. Sharpley, about the year 1865. He then did business in the Crystal Block, Notre Dame Street. These jetons were sold as card markers. R. 2.

R. Sharpley - Importer - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 571 - Canada

571

These coins are said to have been struck in Quebec, for the firm whose name they bear. This firm did an extensive business in dry goods, in St. Roch suburb. There is said to have been over 1,000 issued. The balance, 200 in all, was purchased by Mr. Cyrille Tessier, of Quebec. R. 1.

Jacques Cartier House - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 572 - Canada

572

According to Sir G. Duncan Gibb, these coins were struck in Birmingham for a Montreal firm who employed a number of workingmen. There was a very large issue. R. 1 ½.

Playing cards - 1/2 penny 1870 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 573 - Canada

573

One hundred and ten specimens issued in 1886, and the dies, engraved by C. Tison, are still extant. (See Biography). 5 varieties. R. 2.


Breton 574 - Canada

574

This firm was first known as Hansgen & Gnaedinger. Ten thousand of these coins were struck in Germany, about the year 1887. R. 1.

L. Gnaedinger, Son & Company - 1852 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 575 - Canada

575

Struck in Germany. There were 200 of these issued in 1887. The dies still remaining undestroyed. Mr. Desjardins, who is 40 years of age, commenced collecting in J885. The whole issue of this coin was delivered to Mr. Desjardins with suspension ring, these he had taken out before they were circulated. R. 2.

D. Desjardins - Marchand Tailleur - Price Guide and Values


Breton 576 - Canada

576

Mr. Cardinal was born at St. Cyprien, Napierville County, on the 29th of October, 1861, and is therefore 32 years of age. He commenced collecting coins and medals in I883, and, during several years, was one of the most active Numismatists, and was especially an amateur of fine coins. Mr. Cardinal kept the run of all the coin sales in the United States, having the reputation of a keen buyer. In 1886, he ordered the coin illustrated above, but by mistake the word Canada was omitted. Eleven of these pieces were struck, and afterwards Canada, as in No. 577 was added to the die, which was adopted. Mr. Cardinal only got one specimen for himself having refused the balance, they were sold to Mr. R. W. McLachlan. R. 3 ½.

E.A. Cardinal - Numismatist - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 577 - Canada

577

Issue 100. The dies are still extant. (See note No. 576). R. 1 ½.

E.A. Cardinal - Numismatist - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 578 - Canada

578

Issue 100, by the same as the last, Nos. 576 and 577. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

E.A. Cardinal - Numismatist - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 579 - Canada

579

Mr. Lymburner ordered these dies in 1871. In 1872 he entered into partnership with Mr. Chas. Martin. After several years this partnership was dissolved, when the dies remained in the hands of Martin, who sold them to Dr. Elliott Woodward, of Roxbury, Mass., who sold them at auction in 1878. They, at that time, came into the hands of Dr. J. Leroux, who had 100 copies struck, besides those struck by Lymburner, of which the number is not known, but the first issue can be distinguished by the planchet, which is much thinner than the last issue. The dies are still extant. R. 2.

Lymburner & Brothers - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 580 - Canada

580

The dies of this piece were ordered before the firm was changed, and only two specimens were struck. Afterwards the dies were sold to Messrs. R. W. McLachlan and T. J. Mocock, who had 100 of the coins struck, two of which were in silver, when the dies were destroyed. R. 2.

Lymburner & Brothers - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 581 - Canada

581

Issued in 1886 by Lymburner, as an advertising card for his patent heater. The obverse of Cardinal's coin, No. 577, was used in striking this token. R. 1 ½.

Lymburner & Brothers - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 582 - Canada

582

Two hundred struck in December, 1885. The dies are still in existence, but in very bad order. Dr. J. Leroux issued this and the four following pieces to advertise his Numismatic works. (See Biography.) R. 1 ½.

Jos Leroux - Canadian Copper Catalogue - Price Guide and Values


Breton 583 - Canada

583

Issued in January, 1886. Only 86 struck, but the dies still exist, although in bad order. R. 2.

Jos Leroux - Canadian Copper Catalogue - Price Guide and Values


Breton 584 - Canada

584

There were 194 struck in January, 1886. The dies are still in existence, but in bad order. R. 1 ½.

Jos Leroux - Canadian Copper Catalogue - Price Guide and Values


Breton 585 - Canada

585

One thousand impressions struck in copper, in 1891. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Jos Leroux - Canadian Copper Catalogue - Price Guide and Values


Breton 586 - Canada

586

One thousand struck in 1891. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Jos Leroux - Canadian Copper Catalogue - Price Guide and Values


Breton 587 - Canada

587

The checker club that had been in existence for ten years, was amalgamated with the chess club in 1891, and the annual subscription was fixed at $3.00. It was decided to have a Jeton de presence or admission ticket struck in copper. The commission was entrusted to Dr. J. Leroux to order 100 of the above Jeton. The dies are still in existence. R. 2 ½.

Club d'echecs et de dames - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 588 - Canada

588

During a trip to Europe in 1889, Dr. J. Leroux visited the workshop of J. Moore, the celebrated medalist of Birmingham. This was on the 15th of June. Among a number of trial and other pieces, he found the coin above illustrated, and after having learned that the dies were still intact, ordered 500 of these coins to be struck. These were to be ready when he returned, but only 98 were delivered, as the dies broke after that number had been struck. This check was ordered for Guilbault's Gardens, into which it was intended that the admission fee should be 30 sous, (25 cents) but as the admission has always been 15 sous (12 1/2, cents), the coin was refused, and for this reason the dies remained with Mr. Moore. R. 2 ½.


Breton 589 - Canada

589

Brass piece struck in Germany about 1887, to be used in a German club, meeting on St. Catherine Street. These were only in use a short time and the balance, 900 out of the 1000 issued, also with the die destroyed, were sold to P. N. Breton. The reverse is a stock die used for striking Speil marks or card markers. R. 1 ½.

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 590 - Canada

590

This and the following fifteen coins, Nos. 591 to 605, were struck as mules with the obverse die of the last, No. 589, and the obverses of small Tetons struck in commemoration of different kings and other rulers who have reigned during the past fifty years. Only three specimens were issued of each of the Nos. 590 to 597, and about 20 of each of Nos. 598 to 605. Rarity 4 ½ for the set of 8 pieces, Nos. 590 to 597. Rarity 3 ½ for the set of 8 pieces, Nos. 598 to 605.

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 591 - Canada

591

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 592 - Canada

592

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 593 - Canada

593

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 594 - Canada

594

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 595 - Canada

595

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 596 - Canada

596

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 597 - Canada

597

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 598 - Canada

598

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 599 - Canada

599

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 600 - Canada

600

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 601 - Canada

601

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 602 - Canada

602

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 603 - Canada

603

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 604 - Canada

604

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 605 - Canada

605

Gesangverein Teutonia - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 606 - Canada

606

Mr. P. O. Tremblay, who is now 30 years of age, commenced the hardware business in 1886, in partnership with Mr. Mathieu, under the style of Mathieu & Tremblay. On the 1st of May, 1893, Tremblay continued the business alone, at the old stand on Notre Dame Street. He became interested in Numismatics about fifteen years ago, and is well thought of among his confreres. In 1892 he, desiring to make himself better known among collectors, had 225 of the coins above illustrated, struck. The dies engraved by C. Tison, have been destroyed. R. 2.

P.O. Tremblay - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 607 - Canada

607

Three hundred and twenty-five pieces were issued of this coin, by the same collector as issued the last, No. 606. The dies, also engraved by C. Tison, have been destroyed. R. 2.

P.O. Tremblay - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 608 - Canada

608

In 1890 the Montreal Witness offered a series of prizes to be competed for among the common school children throughout the Dominion. The best story of some event relating to the county, in which the scholar lived, was to be the subject. Every scholar who complied received one of the tokens, one side of which is copied from the reverse of the Canadian Jeton of 1754, No. 514. Issue, about 2,300 in white metal, with a few in copper. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

The Montreal Witness - Prize Competition - Price Guide and Values


Breton 609 - Canada

609

This piece was issued in 1891 for a similar competition as last, No. 608. Two thousand were struck in Aluminum. The design represents a Roman denarius of Tiberius. The obverse die is broken. R. 1 ½.

The Montreal Witness - Prize Competition - Price Guide and Values


Breton 610 - Canada

610

This piece was issued in 1888 by Sergeant A. Desjardins, then of the Montreal police force, to be used by Mr. Phelan. Five hundred were struck and used for a time as bread checks. The dies are destroyed. 3 varieties. R. 1 ½.

T. Phelan - Montreal - St. Catherine - Price Guide and Values


Breton 611 - Canada

611

This coin, which bears the name of L. Landry, was never ordered by him. Six of this and the following coin were sent to him, but he never learned whence they came. As a number more have since appeared in different metals and sold to collectors, we come to the conclusion that these coins were issued as a speculation, to be sold as a Numismatic novelty. R. 2.

L. Landry - Montreal - Pain - Price Guide and Values


Breton 612 - Canada

612

Issued as last, No. 611. R. 2.

L. Landry - Montreal - Pain - Price Guide and Values


Breton 613 - Canada

613

Issue 100 in brass, as good for one glass of St. Leon Water. The check is not now used. Mr. Hoerner is 41 years old, and has been doing business as a druggist in Three Rivers since 1872. (Composite dies.) R. 2.

Hoerner - Three Rivers - Water - Price Guide and Values


Breton 614 - Canada

614

Mr. Williams, who has been carrying on business as a druggist in Three Rivers since 1879, is now 40 years old. He has been collecting since 1874, but only actively since 1891. It was in the latter year that he had 1,000 of the above piece made to distribute it in the district of Three Rivers as a business advertisement, but on learning that they were picked up by commercial travelers, who carried them to collectors, he stopped distributing them after 400 had been sent out, keeping the balance. The dies are destroyed. R. 1 ½.


Breton 615 - Canada

615

Two hundred copies struck from composite dies. They were, for a time, used in Mr. Williams' Drug store, and accepted in payment of a glass of Caxton Water, but their use has been abandoned. Mr. Williams was the proprietor of the Caxton Springs. R. 1 ½.

R.W. Williams - Three Rivers - Caxton - Price Guide and Values


Breton 616 - Canada

616

Struck in brass. About 500 issued in the Toronto agency, to be accepted in payment of a glass of St. Leon Water. The water is sold at two and a half cents per glass, and when five cents is tendered in payment, one of these checks was given in exchange. R. 1 ½.

C.E.A. Langlois - Toronto - Water - Price Guide and Values


Breton 617 - Canada

617

The company does not appear to have issued this check; it, was, no doubt, made a private speculation. R. 1 ½.

C.E.A. Langlois - Montreal - Water - Price Guide and Values


Breton 618 - Canada

618

Struck in white metal and brass. Used in the different agencies of the company. The dies were made in Toronto. R. 1.

St. Leon Mineral Water Company Limited - Price Guide and Values


Breton 619 - Canada

619

Struck in aluminum and in brass. The dies were made in Toronto. R. 1.

St. Leon Mineral Water Company Limited - Price Guide and Values


Breton 620 - Canada

620

Issue 100, by I. B. Durocher. These were never used in the hotel; a number of the checks were given away. This coin has sold as high as ten dollars. R. 3.

Richelieu Hotel - I.B. Durocher - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 621 - Canada

621

Issue 100, by Vital Raparie, who, for the last 19 years, kept a hotel at the corner of Notre Dame and Guy Streets, Montreal, and since the 11th of June last, has removed to 2276 Notre Dame Street. These were used as pool checks. R. 1 ».


Breton 622 - Canada

622

Issue 200, by the same as last, No. 621, but these were never used in the hotel, as they were struck to sell to collectors. R. 1


Breton 623 - Canada

623

Issue of 500 by the same as the last two, Nos. 621 and 622. R. 1.


Breton 624 - Canada

624

Issue 200 by Francois Sylvestre for use in his hotel on St. Catherine St., Montreal. R. 1 ½.

Francois Sylvestre (F.S.) - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 625 - Canada

625

Issue 100 by Gideon Normandin, who keeps a hotel on Notre Dame St., in the Town of St. Henri, near Montreal. R. 1 ½.

Gedeon Normandin - St. Henri - Hotel - Price Guide and Values


Breton 626 - Canada

626

Issue 100 by the same as last, No. 625. R. 1 ½.

Gedeon Normandin - St. Henri - Hotel - Price Guide and Values


Breton 627 - Canada

627

Issue 100 by same as last two, Nos. 625 and 626. R. 1 ½.

Gedeon Normandin - St. Henri - Hotel - Price Guide and Values


Breton 628 - Canada

628

Issue 100 by Napoleon Tremblay, for use in his hotel on Notre Dame St., St. Henri. R. 1 ½.

Napoleon Tremblay (N.T.) - St. Henri - Price Guide and Values


Breton 629 - Canada

629

Issue 100 by Anatole Papineau, who succeeded to Nap. Tremblay. (See No. 628.) R. 1 ½.

Anatole Papineau (A.P.) - St. Henri - Price Guide and Values


Breton 630 - Canada

630

Issue 300 from composite dies. Mr. Laurin commenced to collect coins in 1890. The balance of these coins were purchased by Mr. P. N. Breton, Montreal. R. 1 ½.

Louis Laurin - Gatineau - Price Guide and Values


Breton 631 - Canada

631

One hundred issued in 1890 from composite dies. The balance of these coins were purchased by Mr. P. N. Breton. Mr. Foley commenced to keep hotel in 1885. R. 1 ½.

M. Foley - Drink - Gatineau - 25 cents - Price Guide and Values


Breton 632 - Canada

632

One hundred issued in 1889, from composite dies. Mr. Smith commenced business in 1867. These checks were only a short time in use. The balance were purchased by Mr. P. N. Breton. R. 1 ½.

W. Smith - Gatineau - Price Guide and Values


Breton 633 - Canada

633

One hundred issued in 1891, from composite dies. Neveu retired from business in 1892. R. 1 ½.

J.B. Neveu - Gatineau - Grocer - 1891 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 634 - Canada

634

Mr. Archambault, who is now 27 years of age, commenced to collect in 1890. In 1892 he ordered this coin, hut as there were two mistakes in spelling the word monnaie, which was written with only one N, only twelve were struck, after which the dies were turned down to be used for the following coin, No. 635. Of these twelve pieces, nine were sold to Mr. P. N. Breton, of Montreal. R. 3 ½.

D. Archambault - Montreal - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 635 - Canada

635

Issue 55, by the same collector, to rectify the mistake on the last, No. 634. The dies are still extant. R. 1 ½.

D. Archambault - Montreal - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 636 - Canada

636

Issue 223 pieces. The dies were engraved by C. Tison, the coat of arms side is broken. Mr. Marchand, who is a member of the firm of Gareau & Marchand, dry goods merchants, commenced to collect in 1891. He is now 37 years of age. R. 1 ½.

J.O. Marchand - Collectionneur - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 637 - Canada

637

Issue 74 pieces, by the same. One of the dies is broken as in 636. Engraved by C. Tison. R. 2 ½.

J.O. Marchand - Collectionneur - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 638 - Canada

638

Issue 50 pieces. Gareau & Marchand keep two stores in Montreal, and customers who make purchases at the chief store, on St. Catherine Street, receive one of these checks, which are accepted at the Rachel street branch for the trimming of a lady's hat. The dies are still extant. R. 1 ½.


Breton 639 - Canada

639

Issue of 50 be the same firm as the last, No. 638. It is good for the cost of cutting one suit. The dies, engraved by C. Tison, are still extant. R. 1 ½.

Gareau & Marchand - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 640 - Canada

640

This and the following seven tokens, Nos. 640 to 647, were issued by Mr. L. Gravel, to be exchanged for other coins among collectors. Mr. Gravel, who is 29 years of age, commenced collecting in 1889. Issue of 232. The dies were engraved by C. Tison, and the reverse side is broken. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 641 - Canada

641

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 642 - Canada

642

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 643 - Canada

643

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 644 - Canada

644

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 645 - Canada

645

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 646 - Canada

646

Issue 111 pieces. The dies still exist. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 647 - Canada

647

Issue 28 pieces. The dies are still extant. R. 1 ½.

Ludger Gravel - Rue St.Paul - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 648 - Canada

648

Issue 400 pieces by J. Lanctot, instead of Lanclot. R. 1.

J. Lanctot - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 649 - Canada

649

This check is used at the B Battery Canteen, at Quebec. R. 2.

B. Battery Canteen - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 650 - Canada

650

Used at the B Battery Canteen, as No. 649. R. 2.

B. Battery Canteen - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 651 - Canada

651

Struck in aluminum in 1892, to be used as tickets on the steamer Vega, to and from Longueuil and Montreal. This was a new opposition line. The above bears the card of W. Sclater & Co., who are interested in the company. R. 1.

Montreal-Longueil - 1892 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 652 - Canada

652

Issue 200 from composite dies. These pieces are still used as bons for discount allowed to purchasers. R. 1.

A. Labelle - Hull P.Q. - Price Guide and Values


Breton 653 - Canada

653

Issue 100 in 1891, from composite dies. These are still in use. R. 1.

Jos. Dubois - Perking Mills - Price Guide and Values


Breton 654 - Canada

654

Kollmyer carried on business in Montreal, as a merchant tailor, thirty or forty years ago, and this piece, struck in copper, was probably used as buttons for a yacht club or some steam boat company. R. 4.


Breton 655 - Canada

655

T. Bergeron has carried on business as a grocer in Montreal, since 1889. There were 25 of these Jetons struck from dies by C. Tison. These dies have been destroyed. The balance, thirteen in all, were purchased by Mr. J. O. Marchand. R. 3 ½.

T. Bergeron - Grocerie - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 656 - Canada

656

R. 1.

John Tyo - Dundee - 5 cents 1895 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 657 - Canada

657

E. Caumartin has his bake house at 1205 St. Denis Street. This, and the following piece, were ordered through Mr. J. O. Marchand, who ordered 300, but, by mistake, gave Mr. Caumartin's old address. For this reason they were refused. The obverse die was altered for the two corrected checks, Nos. 659 and 660. Only 25 were struck. Dies by C. Tison. R. 1 ½.

E. Caumartin - Montreal - Boulanger - Price Guide and Values


Breton 658 - Canada

658

See note to No. 657. The order for 300 of this variety was completed before the error was discovered. R. 1 ½.

E. Caumartin - Montreal - Boulanger - Price Guide and Values


Breton 659 - Canada

659

Altered dies with correct number of street. Issue 25 pieces. The dies are still extant. R. 1.

E. Caumartin - Montreal - Boulanger - Price Guide and Values


Breton 660 - Canada

660

Issue 300. (See note to No. 637.) The dies are still extant. R. 1.

E. Caumartin - Montreal - Boulanger - Price Guide and Values


Breton 661 - Canada

661

Tellier & Co., vinegar manufacturers, of Sorel, ordered the dies of this piece from Tison, but did not accept them. They were purchased by Mr. J. 0. Marchand, who had twenty specimens in lead. The dies were altered to strike the following piece, No. 662. R. 2 ½.


Breton 662 - Canada

662

Issue 31 pieces by Mr. J. 0. Marchand, who altered the dies of No. 661. The dies broke after the above number had been struck. R. 3.


Breton 663 - Canada

663

Struck in lead. Bacquet was a hotel-keeper in Quebec in 1832. His first place was on Market Square, Lower Town, later he removed to No. 2 St. Peter Street, in 1860, to No. 64 in the same street, and in 1861, to No. 9 Fort Street. This coin was unknown to collectors until a hoard came to light in 1892. R. 2 ½.

M. Bacquet - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 664 - Canada

664

Issue 100 by Mr. L. R. Baridon, druggist, of Montreal, to advertise his patent medicine Baume Rhumal. Mr. Baridon had got together a very line collection of Canadian coins that in 1891 he sold to Mr. P. N. Breton. Since then he commenced a second collection, which has already become large and representative. The dies engraved by C. Tison are still extant. R. 1.

Baume Rhumal - L.R. Baridon - Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 665 - Canada

665

R. 1.

A. Boure - Quebec - Loaf - Price Guide and Values


Breton 666 - Canada

666

R. 1.

A. Boure - Quebec - Loaf - Price Guide and Values


Breton 668 - Canada

668

Issue 1,000 in 1893. Not in use. R. 1.

W.H. Childs - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


Breton 669 - Canada

669

Issue 1,000 in 1893. Not in use. R. 1.

W.H. Childs - Quebec - Price Guide and Values


The Bouquet Series

(Illustrated under Nos. 534 to 545.)

The Bouquet or Un Sou series is, without doubt, the most interesting of our Canadian Coins, and towards the completion of which our collectors should not fail to devote their best energies. The description of these coins in this edition is full, and the classification, which has always been difficult, so simplified that it can now be easily accomplished. This classification is commenced by counting the leaves in the wreath; thus, Nos. 674 to 682 have each sixteen leaves, then it remains to note the differences in the bouquet or the ribbon with which it is tied, whether it extends to the right, left, or to the right and left in the same way with the others, Nos. 683 and 684 have seventeen leaves in the wreath ; Nos. 685 to 703 eighteen; 704 and 705 twenty; 706 to 709 thirty two ; and 710 to 712 forty.

Now, to assort a lot of sous, they should be first arranged in piles according to the number of leaves in the wreath, as. 16, 17, 18, 20, 32 and 40, and thus each pile taken separately and arranged according to the bouquets and ribbons.

In this manner a very large lot can be arranged in a very short time. It is well here to remark, that there are great rarities to be found among the bouquets with only some slight point of difference either in the bouquet or the wreath, to distinguish them from the more common varieties.

Breton 670 - Canada

670

Both dies are cracked. The bouquet on this coin is the same as on Nos. 681-685 and 686, which indicates that these were struck by the same firm in the United States as struck the Duseaman. The Belleville inscribed on this coin is in the State of New Jersey. It is classed as Canadian on account of the bouquet. Most of the specimens known were found in circulation in Canada. R. 2.

T. Duseaman - Butcher - Belleville - Price Guide and Values


Breton 671 - Canada

671

Struck on thick and thin planchets. It is somewhat rare in good condition. R. 2.

J.H. Roy - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 672 - Canada

672

Unique – The only specimen known, now in the collection of Mr. R. W. McLachlan, was sold in the Levick collection in New York, 1884. It was purchased by Mr. James Oliver of New York, for $62.00. It is believed to be struck from dies engraved by Joseph Arnault in Montreal. R. 6.

1/2 penny 1837 - Bono Publico Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 673 - Canada

673

This has the same obverse as last, and must therefore have been struck by the same man. It is, after the last, No. 672, probably the rarest of the bouquet series. R. 5.

1/2 penny - Undated - Price Guide and Values


Breton 674 - Canada

674

Un Sou - Plain and milled edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Copper and brass. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 675 - Canada

675

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Very rare. R. 5.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 676 - Canada

676

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 682. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 677 - Canada

677

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as 678. R. 4.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 678 - Canada

678

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 677. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 679 - Canada

679

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 692. Copper and brass. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 680 - Canada

680

Un Sou - Plain edge: dies cracked. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 683 - 695 and 696. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 681 - Canada

681

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 670 - 635 and 686. R. 4.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 682 - Canada

682

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 16 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 676. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 683 - Canada

683

Un Sou - Plain edge: the bouquet die cracked. Rev: Wreath of 17 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 680 - 695 and 696. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 684 - Canada

684

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 17 leaves. Copper and brass. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 685 - Canada

685

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. This differs from the following No. 686 in the wreath, which is slightly more open at the top. Same bouquet as No. 670 - 681 and 686. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 686 - Canada

686

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 670 - 681 and 685. The only difference between this and the last, No. 685 is, that the leaves at the top of the wreath are closer. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 687 - Canada

687

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 688 - Canada

688

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 693. R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 689 - Canada

689

Un Sou - Plain and milled edges. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. The dies of this Sou were found on the premises occupied by the late Dr. Picault, about 1863. At the time of their discovery, they were presented to the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Montreal, when three or four copies were struck in lead. Until of late years, but one original copy was known, which was in Gerald E. Hart's collection, when another one was found by Dr. J. Leroux in one of his trips to Ottawa, this last one he sold to Mr. P. N. Breton for $60.00. Four or five specimens were struck in copper in 1880, but these were poorly done as they wanted the ring. In 1890, on the desire of a number of members, the dies were arranged to receive a ling, and 24 proofs in copper were struck. As the supply had become exhausted in 1893, twelve more were ordered, 11 in copper and 1 in brass. If the Society goes on issuing, this rare piece might become an ordinary common Sou. R. 3.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 690 - Canada

690

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. R. 4.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 691 - Canada

691

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 692 - Canada

692

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 679. R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 693 - Canada

693

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 688. R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 694 - Canada

694

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves R. 1.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 695 - Canada

695

Un Sou - Plain edge. Perfect and cracked dies. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 680 - 683 and 696. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 696 - Canada

696

Un Sou - Plain edge. Perfect and cracked dies. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 680 - 683 and 695. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 697 - Canada

697

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Perfect and cracked dies. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 698 - Canada

698

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 699 and 715. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 699 - Canada

699

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same bouquet as Nos. 698 and 715. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 700 - Canada

700

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same reverse as No. 701. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 701 - Canada

701

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Two varieties. Hart variety - three blades between the ear of wheat and thistle flower to the left. Same reverse as No. 700. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 702 - Canada

702

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Perfect and cracked dies. Same reverse as No. 703. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 703 - Canada

703

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 18 leaves. Same reverse as No. 702. R. 4 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 704 - Canada

704

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 20 leaves. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 705 - Canada

705

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 20 leaves. Two varieties. Hart variety - one blade between the two thistle heads to the left. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 706 - Canada

706

Un Son - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 32 leaves. Same reverse as Nos. 707, 708 and 709. R. 2 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 707 - Canada

707

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 32 leaves. Same reverse as No. 706, 708, and 709. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 708 - Canada

708

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 32 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 710. Same reverse as Nos. 706, 707 and 709. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 709 - Canada

709

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 32 leaves. Same reverse as Nos. 706, 707 and 708. R. 2.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 710 - Canada

710

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 40 leaves. Same bouquet as No. 708. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 711 - Canada

711

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 40 leaves. R. 1 ½.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 712 - Canada

712

Un Sou - Plain edge. Rev: Wreath of 40 leaves. A sensation was created by the discovery of the first specimen in 1891. Since then another specimen was found by Mr. P. O. Tremblay of Montreal. Both specimens are now in the cabinet of Mr. Gerald E. Hart. R. 5.

Bouquet - 1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 713 - Canada

713

Un Sous - Plain edge. Leroux mentions six, and Gerald Hart eight varieties of this coin. The dies were engraved at Birmingham, and the English die cutters put sous in place of sou. R. 1.

1 sous - Bank Token - Price Guide and Values


Breton 714 - Canada

714

Un Sous - Plain edge. (See note to No. 713.) Leroux mentions four varieties of this piece. Issued by the Bank of Montreal, from the year 1835 to 1838. The issue must have been extensive as an order in council prohibited all copper coins save those issued by the Bank of Montreal and La Banque du Peuple. R. 1.

1 sous 1838 - Bank of Montreal - Price Guide and Values


Breton 715 - Canada

715

Un Sou - Milled edge and thick planchets. There exists a thin planchet variety with plain edge, but it is very rare. The same bouquet appears on No. 698 and 699. Two varieties. Hart variety is in the wreath which touches at the top. R. 1.

1 sou 1838 - Price Guide and Values


Breton 716 - Canada

716

Un Sou - Milled edges. The dies of this coin were engraved in Montreal by Joseph Arnault. They are still in possession of the bank. This is known as the rebellion token, because the accountant who, sympathizing with the rebellion of 1837, the year the coin was issued, caused a small star and a liberty cap, emblems of independence, to be engraved between the leaves of the wreath. R. 1 ½.

1 sou 1837 - Price Guide and Values


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